Northern California Squash Racquets Association Yearbook, 1978-79

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SQUASH RACQUETS ASSOCIATION YEARBOOK

1978/79 SEASON

CONTENTS

1979/80 PACIFIC COAST TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE
N.C.S.R.A. TREASURER’S REPORT
U.S.S.R.A. MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 
N.C.S.R.A. AND P.C.S.R.A. MEETINGS
MEMBER CLUBS
LIFE MEMBERS
A BRIEF SQUASH TRILOGY
TOURNAMENT PLAY
LEAGUE PLAY
RULES FOR LEAGUE PLAY AND DIRECTORY
INSILCO B/C TOURNAMENT
MEMBER CLUB ACTIVITIES
MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY
CHANGE OF ADDRESS FORM
N.C.S.R.A. MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
P.C.S.R.A. RANKINGS
34TH P.C.S.R.A. TOURNAMENT DRAW SHEETS
N.C.S.R.A. RANKINGS
INDEX TO SPONSORS/ADVERTISERS

OFFICERS 1979/80

PRESIDENT- TOM DASHIELL
1st V. P. RANKINGS- GUY LAMPARD
2nd V. P. LEAGUES- BOB HOWELL
SECRETARY- BRETT ELEBASH
TREASURER- DAVID S. BROWN JR.

PAST PRESIDENTS

DICK CRAWFORD 1969-1971
ALAN FOX 1971-1973
DICK CRAWFORD 1973-1974
PETER GAYNOR 1974-1977
DAVID TEPPER 1977-1979

******

79/80 PACIFIC COAST SQUASH RACQUETS ASSOCIATION TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE

SEPTEMBER
21-23 Inland Empire Champs, Spokane, WA (70+)
28-30 Fall Pat Easter Invitational Tennis World, Seattle, WA (S)

OCTOBER
5-7 Harbour Square Invitational Victoria, BC (S)
5-7 Joe Ginet Invit, Fresno, CA (70+)
12-14 Venice Squash Club Champs, Venice, CA (70+)
19-21 College Club Champs, Seattle, WA (S)
19-21 Olympic Club C-D Invit, San Francisco, CA (70+)
26-28 Jericho Tennis Club Invitational, Vancouver, BC (S)

NOVEMBER
2-4 *ALBERTA SINGLES SQUASH CHAMPS, EDMONTON, ALBERTA (S)
2-4 Multnomah Athletic Club Invitational Portland, OR (S)
2-4 South Bay Club Champs, Torrance, CA (70+)
2-4 Boodles British Gin Invit. Doubles, Univ. Club of S. F.
9-11 Western Canadian Jr. Champs, Vancouver, BC (S)
9-11 Ralfe D. Miller Champs, Univ. of Calif, Berkeley, CA (70+)
16-18 Blue Mountain Champs, Vancouver, BC (S)

16-18 Oregon State Doubles Champs, Multnomah A.C., Portland, OR
16-18 San Diego Champs, San Diego, CA (70+)
23-25 Vancouver Racquet Club Champs, Vancouver, BC (S)
23-25 Washington State Jr. Champs, Seattle, WA (70+) 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER

30-1 Western Canadian Doubles, Vancouver L.T.&B., Vancouver 

30-1 *UNIVERSITY CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO CHAMPS (70+)

DECEMBER
7-9 Vancouver & District Jr. Champs, Vancouver, BC (S)
7-9 *PACIFIC NORTHWEST SINGLES CHAMPS, SEATTLE TENNIS CLUB (70+)
14-16 Richmond Racquets Club ‘Invit., Richmond, BC (S)
14-16 University Club of Los Angeles Champs. (70+)
14-10 United States Jr. Champs, Philadelphia, PA (70+).

JANUARY

4-6 Pacific Northwest Jr. Champs, Victoria, BC (S)
4-6 Pacific Coast Doubles Champs, Seattle, WA
4-6 PCSRA Doubles Veterans & Seniors, Univ. Club of S. F., CA
11-13 Racquet Club of Victoria Champs, Victoria, BC (S)
11-13 Squash Club Int’l Champs, Los Angeles, CA (70+)
18-20 Univ. of British Columbia C-D, Vancouver, BC (S)
18-20*WASHINGTON STATE CHAMPS, WASH.A.C., SEATTLE, WA (70+)
18-20 Canadian Jr. Squash Champs, (site to be selected)
25-27 Western Canadian Singles Champs, Hollyburn Country Club, Vancouver, BC (S)
25-27 Olympic Club Invit., San Francisco, CA (70+)
25-27 Alberta Open Squash Champs, Calgary, Alberta (S)

FEBRUARY
1-3 Cate School Invitational, Carpinteria, CA (70+)
1-3 *OREGON STATE CHAMPS, PORTLAND, OR (70+)
8-10 Canadian National Singles Champs, Toronto, Ontario (70+)
8-10 Winter Pat Easter Invit., Seattle, WA (70+)
8-10 *CALIFORNIA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS, San Francisco, CA (70+)
15-17 United States National Singles Champs, Princeton, NJ (70+)
15-17 British Columbia Doubles Champs., Vancouver Racquet Club
22-24 Evergreen Squash Club Champs, Vancouver, BC (70+)
22-24 Lapham Cup & Grant Trophy Matches, Buffalo, NY
22-24 Western States Intercollegiate Singles, Univ. Calif. Berkeley

FEBRUARY-MARCH

29-2 Labatt Club Finals, Vancouver, BC (S)29-2 Seattle City Club Champs, Seattle, WA (70+) 29-2 Northern California Champs, San Francisco, CA (70+)
29-2 U.S. National Intercollegiate Sgis Champs (site to be determined)
29-2 Shawnigan Lake Invit., Shawnigan Lake, BC (S)

MARCH
7-9   *PACIFIC COAST CHAMPS, VANCOUVER L.T.B.CLUB, BC (70+)
14-16 British Columbia Jr. Champs, Vancouver, BC (S)
14-16*SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAMPS, Venice, CA (70+)
14-16 INSILCO USSRA Nat’l B & C Sngls Champs, Boston, MA (70+)
21-23*BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAMPS, VANCOUVER, BC (S)
21-23 Canadian Doubles Champs, Montreal, Quebec
28-30 United States National Doubles Champs, Wilmington, DE
28-30 Aristos Club Champs, Tijuana, Mexico (70+)

******

ORDER YOUR P.C.S.R.A. TIE – AND – SUPPORT NORCAL! This handsome tie, designed by a NorCal member, has a navy background with the P.C.S.R.A. Logo in red and white. It is available at a cost of $10, with profits going to NorCal. Send your check in the amount of $10, made payable to N.C.S.R.A. to David Brown, Treasurer, c/o Union Bank, 50 Calif. St, SF 94111.

1978/79 SEASON TREASURER’S REPORT

Balance to the New Treasurer                            $2,145.99

RECEIPTS:

Membership Dues:
                     Life Members (6 @ $75) $ 450.
                     Contributing   (9 @ $16)    144.
                     Sustaining   (161 @ $8)   1,288.
                     Student          (51 @ $4)       204.
                                                                                     $2,086.

League Dues:                         7 @ $15     105.

                                               13 @ $10 .    130,

235.

Development Fund:

Joe Ginet Invita, 33.50
U. C. Invita.         66.50
Ralfe Miller .       45.00

145.

U.S.S.R.A.: Revenue Sharing – Insilco  150.
                                                                                150,
Interest- Savings:                                   58.90
                                                                                58.90
Overpayment .                               3.
                                                                               3.
Sub-Total:                                                             2677.90
TOTAL RECEIPTS:                                            4823.89

DISBURSEMENTS:

League Brochures-Reproduction costs $ (58.05)
                                                                                               $(58.05)
U.S.S.R.A.: Voluntary Assessment            (156.00)
Annual Dues                                                (50.00)
                                                                                               (206.00)
Tournaments: Mailing, address labels, etc. (37.95)
                                                                                                 (37.95)

Newsletter: Reproduction #1           (86,37)
                      Stamps                            (48.00)
                      Reproduction #2           (84.35)
                      Stamps                            (69.75)
                                                                                             (288.47)

Yearbook:    Typesetting                  (38.34)
                      Deposit                          (500.00)
                      Typing                           (126.00)
                      Envelopes                     (85.20)
                     Printing                         (778.00)

NorCal Tournament: Stamps        (12.50)
                                       T-Shirts       (422.40)

(434.90)
Checking Account – Service Charge  (17.91)
                                                                                      (17.91)
Miscellaneous Expense- Supplies      (9.59)
                                                                                       (9.59)

Development Fund:
        National Ad – Portland                       (90.00)
        Fees (Portland)  NorCal plyrs           (200.00)                  
       World Championship Squash-Ad     (80.00)

                                                                                          (370.00)

Sub-Total:                                                                       (2,950.41)

BALANCE – CASH:                                                                            $1,873.48

BALANCE SHEET, March 2, 1979

ASSETS:
       Cash: Checking                                                        $ 402.48
       Life Membership Savings                                     1,450.00    
       Development Fund                                                      21.00

                                                                                                              $1,873.48

Accounts Receivable: League Dues (Billed)                210.00
                                        Development Fund .                   ?
                                        Olympic C-D (Billed) .                 ?
                                        Association Dues (Billed)        210.00
                                        NorCal Tourn/Dinner (77/78: $1,631)

                                                                                              420.00+

TOTAL ASSETs                                                                                   $2,293.45                                                               
LIABILITIES:

Accounts Payable:
            Development Fund: U.C. Berkeley                 $ 100.00
            NorCal Tourn/Dinners/Trophies
            (77/78: $1,032.69)
             Reimbursement- Pres. Tepper to National ?
             P.C.S.R.A. Annual Dues            ?                                              

TOTAL LIABILITIES:                                                       100.00+

NET WORTH:                                                                                         $2,193.48.

Respectfully Submitted,
David S. Brown Jr.
Treasurer, N.C.S.R.A.

******

ANNUAL MEETING

March 4, 1979

Executive Committee Members Present: David Tepper, Bob Howell, David Brown Jr., Brett Elebash, and Peter Gaynor, PCSRA President. Representatives and interested Members Present: Chapin Coit, Bill Garratt, Charlotte Gaynor, Bruce Gaynor, Jim Gibbons, Rich Jacinto, Guy Lampard, Jim Urbanski, and Emmanuel Uren.

President Tepper called the meeting to order and noting the number of people present hoped that this represented inversely the satisfaction of Nor Cal’s members.

So do I.

I. Minutes of Last Annual Meeting: 78-3 A motion to waive the reading of the minutes due to the printing of them in the yearbook was M(oved), S(econded), and C(arried).

II. Treasurer’s Report: David Brown Jr. balanced our budget to find that N.C.S.R.A.’s assets are $2,193.48+. The total membership is around 330, down a little from last year, including 26 life members. Peter Gaynor suggested that we increase the cost of life membership from $75 to $100, justified by inflation and the need for annual support from our members. 78-4 M, S, and C to increase N.C.S.R.A. Life Memberships from $75 to $100.

Every year, the Development Fund gives $20, which goes toward entry fees, to each person participating in the Men’s National Tournament. This year for the first time, NorCal was represented in the Women’s Nationals. President Tepper recommended that the women, too, should be supported. 78-5 MSC that the Development Fund should be used to support men and women alike in regard to the National Tournaments.

III. Leagues: Bob Howell reported with satisfaction that the leagues were operating smoothly, but noted that during February, momentum slackened a bit. During this time defaults occurred more times than necessary. Any formulas or ideas which would make for a more consistent period are welcome. Bill Garratt once again voiced his opinion about the age brackets. Last year the age was dropped to 35 from 40, which brought many fine, “young” players into the Vets league. The intentions were good, but this choice pushed the men over 40 out of the competition. Bill advised that the age limit be raised once again to 40, which would allow a true “Vets” league. The players 35 to 40 will play in the straight A. B, and C classes. 78-6 MSC that the age classification for Veterans be increased to forty (40) years of age.

IV. Presidential Report:

A. Tournaments: President Tepper expressed growing concern over the size of tournaments, which he said is at the breaking point. The classes are so large that play starts on Thursday, continues until 10 p.m. the following night, and consolations are not able to be held. He suggested alternating classes, enabling consolation play. Peter Gaynor added that perhaps each class could be guaranteed to play in four out of the six tournaments held in the Bay Area. A meeting will be called in the Fall to further study the situation and to consider what is best to do.

B. Memberships and Communication: It has come to the attention of many people, particularly the tournament directors, that not all tournament or league players are current members of NorCal. The majority of payments comes during the last third of the season. due in part by the tenacity of the directors. In order to stop this “free ride”, a more conscious effort will be made next year to secure fees. Perhaps it will be necessary to be as blatant as to bar someone from entering the court. I hope it does not come down to this. Players owe it to NorCal and to themselves to act like responsible adults.

One reason that trouble is present is possibly due to the informality of the “membership drive”. Charlotte Gaynor proposed a more formal start for the season: maybe a squash calendar and an application form sent separately from the first tournament entry. Peter Gaynor suggested using Squash News as a medium of communication. People could look in the magazine for applications and goings-on in Northern California. Peter feels as I do that it is a good magazine which promotes squash racquets and lets us know what the other areas of the U.S. and Canada are doing. At a cost of $3 per person it would be included in the membership fee, which could if necessary be increased. Peter will survey the situation further, getting feedback from other regional directors who have taken this particular step.

An exciting part of our squash season is the yearbook which every member enjoys reading and studying. We would like to recognize David Tepper who put an enormous amount of time and energy into this year’s publication. He is the major contributor/author as well as the editor and publicity director.

Here, here, President Tepper!!

78-7 MSC to acknowledge David‘s fine workmanship and generous amounts of time given not only toward the yearbook but also to NorCal as a whole.

Charlotte Gaynor thinks that the most impact from the yearbook comes in the fall – it gets people keyed up for the coming season. We hope next season the yearbook can be printed and distributed early, but that relies on NorCal members. Please, members, help the staff by getting your copy in early when your minds are still fresh with the season. It is so much easier on us and you.

C. Insilco: Club participation in the Insilco Tourney was down from last year. President Tepper, who has been the organizer for two years, suggests having a director other than the President be responsible. This opportunity Insilco presents us with gives Squash a good boost in the arm and we should oblige. We have nothing to lose and all to gain. NorCal has had a finalist in NY both years:

V. Miscellaneous Business: Thanks to both Peter and Charlotte Gaynor who pulled off quite an enjoyable Pacific Coast Tournament and weekend! Two hundred sixty people entered and consolation play was held in all classes, Peter is also NorCal’s representative to the USSRA. (The US is divided into seven regions and we are area #7.)

Of significance from the last meeting was the vote to merge the U.S.W.S.R.A. with the U.S.S.R.A., since both organizations have a single purpose in mind. The U.S.S.R.A. is also developing a teaching professional association which will strengthen and develop the game even more. Peter reminded us that in order to have a national ranking, one must play in U.S.S.R.A. sanctioned tournaments. And in order to be sanctioned, every entrant must be a national member.

In response to recent conduct on the court, Peter Gaynor hoped that some type of disciplinary action would be taken toward players who display unsportsmanlike behavior. Such conduct is totally uncalled for. Perhaps suspension from the next two tournaments is in order as a minimum depending upon the circumstances. In any case, something should be done to deter other such events from happening. 78-8 MSC that any player disqualified from a match is subject to further disciplinary action in league and tournament play, at the discretion of the committee organizing said event.

VI. Elections: President: John Lau was nominated after President Tepper declined to run for office. John was not present at the meeting, but since then has been notified and he, too, has refused the invitation.

Therefore, we do not as yet have a new President! Please come forth and support your team!!

First Vice President: Guy Lampard
Ranking Chairperson Second Vice President: Bob Howell
League Chairperson Treasurer: David Brown
Secretary: Brett Elebash
Publicity: Bill Garratt, Charlotte Gaynor, and David Tepper.

78-9 MSC to thank everybody involved in this year’s work with NorCal. It has been fun.

Meeting adjourned.

Respectfully submitted,
Brett Elebash
5/20/79

******

DECATHLON CL
FIG GARDEN AND RACKET CLUB
FRESNO YMCA
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
THE OLYMPIC CLUB
PENINSULA SQUASH CLUB
PRESIDIO SQUASH CLUB
SAN FRANCISCO BAY CLUB
SAN FRANCISCO TENNIS CLUB
STANFORD UNIVERSITY SQUASH CLUB
UNIVERSITY CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SQUASH CLUB
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MEDICAL CENTER

******

LIFE MEMBERS

William S. Anderson
Marc Bidart
Richard Bidleman

John N. Callander
John Campodonico
John P. Derdivanis
Park T. Dingwell
Christopher Dove
Jerome C. Draper
Alex Eichmann
Reed Foster
William R. Garratt
Wellington Henderson
B. Peck Lau
John A. Letts
Howard Maierhofer
Roger A. Mann
Steven F. Marks
Daniel Morgan
Howard Morrelli
Richard Morton
Thomas A. Otter
Jack Sarafian
Dwight J. Simpson
Robert L. Smith
Douglas Thompkins
Emmanuel Uren
S. Ben Werner
Herman Zwart

******

GOING – PLAYING – BRINGING IT ALL ON HOME

A Brief Squash Trilogy with a Moral for all

(NOTE: Trilogies being all the rage these days, we offer these anonymous glimpses of squash at its finest in good faith if not good conscience – if the cap fits, wear it. For permission to quote from The Khan Game, thanks Hash baby and see ya on the Coast, OK?)

GOING

When the blurry xerox form arrived at my office, I almost threw it out with the circulars for pizza delivery and horror movies; it was only the idle curiosity of a man whose income was derived largely from the unseen efforts of others and who graved an office only for somewhere to go between games of squash, backgammon, and real tennis (as in Camino Real), that prompted me to slit open the crudely folded missive. My first reaction upon deciphering the ill-printed and garbled instructions within was that this was another hoax dreamed up by my old school chum Bashe Wilksford IV who knew all too well my weakness for traveling ridiculous distances at huge expense to risk injury, marital misery, and athlete’s foot for the chance at a silver-plated tray and a cotton tee-shirt. After my secretary had carried in another cup of coffee, matches with which I lighted my third Sobranie of the day (I was not in strict training at the time), and the list of my sporting appointments for the week, the length of which caused me abruptly to extinguish said Sobranie, I tossed the soiled supplication to where her delicate digits drummed the desk. Before I could open my mouth, she reassured me with that easy anticipation that is the hallmark of quality in any field of endeavor. “This is not the work of Mr. Wilksford, Sir”, she always called me Sir by the way. “It has none of his trademarks and I would judge it genuine”. As she spoke she was reading the miserable papyrus closely and I watched as her delicate eyebrows arched in disbelief. “There is no apparent mention of a dinner, a shirt or even soft drinks for an entry fee of $12, the ball of choice bears the dreaded white dot and you would, if my memory of the area is accurate Sir, appear to be playing in a deserted industrial park some 27 miles from your correspondent club. Not even Mr. W would do this to you Sir; the draw closes at five o’clock tonight by the way”

It was a sign of Ms. Wellbeloved’s class (that really is her name and I defy anyone except perhaps Moneypenny to run her even close for class) that by the time I had decided to enter and was stretching out my hand to buzz her, she already had the tournament director on my private line. Ignoring a vocabulary dreaded up by a culty consciousness raiser and brushing off futile efforts to sell me shares in a Naugahyde company (whatever that may be) I discovered to my surprise that I was already entered in my class, that I would be met at the airport, that dinner and suitable accommodations would be provided, and that my entry fee had already been paid, “Very foxy” I muttered to myself as I punched the code for an obscure Peruvian mining company where my captain could always be relied upon to be in conference or in China (People’s Republic of); sure enough his secretary could barely hold back hysterical giggles as she told me that himself would be flying directly to the tournament from Bolivia (a new wrinkle) and had left his kit at the Club for me to bring on Friday. Don’t try calling his wife” she added between snickers, “unless you want to…”. At this point, the phone went dead and the next significant incident to record was dinner a couple of days later with the big Cheese and our wives at his teeny-weeny mansion in the urban woods. After finishing the Stag’s Leap ’69 that I had won in a trial by fire at seven o’clock of a Thursday morning at a club that shares a wall with a lunatic middle-age woman squash-hater whose taste in clothes turned my stomach, and a meal that combined the corrupt extremes of European cuisine with the virginal innocence of American ingredients, we fell to talking of the aforesaid tourney. In all fairness, I should record for posterity that not once did the BC try to dissuade me from my ill-chosen path (mixed metaphor I know but you catch my drift). The recurrence of phrases such as *not in a million years”, “wouldn’t be caught dead” and “lucky if you come back alive” I attributed to an 1867 Madeira that had replaced the disappointing ’64 and it was with high hopes the next day that I patronized my favorite airline.

I always fly first class so that I can carry on my squash bag; the one time that I tried economizing (always a mistake on any form of transport) I was obliged to check my bag and found upon arrival that all three of my Canadian Black Knights had popped strings. in the breast pocket of my light silk jacket nestled the postcard illegibly rubberstamped with the time and opponent for my first round. My secretary Ms. Wellbeloved, whom you may recall, deciphered this to mean that I was to play at five o’clock on Friday afternoon, par for the course for an out-of-towner, and she had already called ahead to confirm my flight arrival as well as my dietary and accommodation requirements – but I called again any way largely because I love to ‘phone from airplanes’. All was set and what I had to do now was settle back and plan my tactics carefully for a challenging weekend. If I had known how challenging, this story might never have been penned.

PLAYING

The Big Cheese, the only man I know to make a good living out of legal herbs, had muttered something about squares of linoleum which I had taken as a feeble attempt at humor and shrugged off; after waiting two and one half hours at the airport for the ride that never came and spending $33 not including tip helping a cab driver find the most God-forsaken building that I have ever seen since I was involved in urban renewal I was, shall we say, upset that the ramshackle door to this degenerate building was firmly padlocked. So much for an hour’s warm-up alone, recommended by every pro and book and impossible to achieve in reality. My cab had left in a cloud of dust, there was no sign of people, phones, even a road, and I was sitting alone on a rutted dirt track looking at the only item of interest within miles – a wall thermometer reading 101° F. To digress for a moment, the immortal bard who was usually pretty reliable in these matters once said something about the evil that men do living on after them (the bit about the good interred with the bones escaped me but maybe he liked marrow) and was he ever right this time. Three years ago or so I had thrashed a man at squash so thoroughly that he almost broke, cursing, crying, appealing every point. even throwing the ball and later his racket at me whilst I maintained my usual icy cool in best Bjorn Borg style. In fact I flashed on Borg beating Panatta in straight sets in the Foro Italico before the ugliest mob this side of a rugby team, a match that I had watched with a great deal of pleasure; how Bjorn behaves in the locker room I do not profess to know, we are not that close, but I regret that after my opponent and I left the court (15-0, 15-4, 15-2 if you must know) I chose to give him the benefit of my not inconsiderable experience in deriving lineage and birthright, accidentally broke his racket over my knee emphasizing a flaw in his character which I felt could be corrected and drew breath only to ask the pretty girl hovering around as they always seem to do when class reveals itself, for a beer, a smoke, and a date. She was his wife of four weeks, and he was running the tournament now in question.

Maybe you had already guessed that but I can be a bit obtuse on occasion and when he showed up, at last, to open the door at five of five, I could not at first understand why he was ignoring me while effusively greeting the restive crowd that had foregathered outside the “club”. Anyway, we all charged in like sheep to the slaughter and unwisely as it turned out I changed first before looking at .the draw on the off chance that my opponent might have sneaked in the back and be ready to claim games by default. Ready for action in my Insilco winner’s shirt (club level to be perfectly honest though I nearly beat the national winner once) I will never know who not only had defeated me in four previous consecutive tourneys but who lived all of three blocks from my home. The airport was already closed which denied me the pleasure of flying straight home and gave me the dubious privilege of having to sit around until 11:30 for the default; he had in fact called to cancel that afternoon but my nemesis “forgot” to tell me. By now, as you have already divined, there was no one there but me and a crazy Polish from Minnetonka or somewhere equally exotic; to be perfectly fair he saved me from utter despair by driving me to Baskin-Robbins for what he hilariously called a Polish feast and then graciously offered to share his motel. We reclined the seats of the rental car after paying a small protection fee to an evil child who should not have been hanging around parking lots let alone up after midnight at all, and tired, hungry, and depressed, I slept like a baby and awoke completely revitalized and ready for the fray.

Curiously the draw appeared to have been changed again for I now was to face the second seed and local hero on his home turf and the clever money was 4-1 against my getting a game. I laid off a few dollars to beat the spread and crawled into the court with my heart in my boots. Everyone has a bad day and for once it was his turn; even though my 11 appeals for let points only yielded one let for me, five points against, and a warning from my opponent’s brother between games for overswinging, even though the referee constantly mis-scored in his favour (BEAT had not helped his mathematics any more than his game) and blew cheap cigar smoke in my face between games while suggesting to the judges that my grip “might be illegal under international rules”, I prevailed over a skilled and decent opponent. This meant I had to stay for the next round at 11 PM of course, how did you guess, but my next victim managed to impale his knee on his racquet in the first game and withdrew in a pool of blood and confusion. For a while there was an ugly (to me) rumor that I would be disqualified for deliberately clearing and thus causing the accident; but wiser heads prevailed and when they let me out, everyone had left again except me and the injured party who released me from the closet whose door had somehow stuck while I was inside looking for bandages, so that I could drive him to a hospital. Emergency rooms are the same all over the world and at 3 AM when he was finally treated and sent home, I was stuck in a cot behind the operating theater and told that I could stay there until dawn. Just as I closed my weary eyes, in staggered the bloody remains of a Mexican gang war to be stitched up and sent back to the barrio or whatever they call it. Police were guarding the exits and I had some difficulty explaining to the officer that I was not involved in what had evidently been something akin to the rumble from West Side Story. Luckily my fluent Spanish with just a hint of a Catalan accent saved the day and I was soon riding back to the squash courts with my new friend Miquel in a car that cannot have been more than an inch of the ground. There was a difficult moment when he tried to explain that without fifty dollars the car would not run but he promised to come back with the change from my hundred as soon as he called his mother after dropping me off. By the way. he and his three friends in the back knew exactly where the club was which should tell you something, and he was anxious to know if there were any more of my friends inside. Luckily BEAT came out and got rid of them, as by now they were getting persistent, but Miquel never came back with my change.

“The semi-finals saw me soundly trounced by an overweight buzzsaw who played the best squash of his life. Whole strings of points were awarded to him while I double-bounced, carried, threw, tinned, and even (twice yet) foot-faulted on the second serve. Bloodied but unbowed, I staggered from the court ignoring the snide jibes and concentrating solely on getting to the airport before it closed.

My second and third rackets had been stolen from behind the court while I was toweling off but I no longer cared; I had Ms. Wellbeloved whom you may recall on the line arranging a limousine to pick me up and get me out before I turned ugly and it is yet another tribute to her skills that 67 minutes later I was relaxing in the VIP lounge with a large drink having my ‘feet massaged while she called my wife and took care of collecting me at the other end. Managing a reasonable facsimile of a man who has enjoyed his weekend, I reflected upon events with some satisfaction; true there was no tee shirt, no beer, no dinner, no ride, and no room at the inn but I had beaten the second seed, I had made the semis, and I had caught the last flight out that day. Such triumphs are harder won than commercial success or marital happiness, believe you me.

BRINGING IT ALL ON HOME

It was not until the second Chivas Regal with crushed ice & Perrier water (I had to compromise on the Scotch but few airlines carry Glenfiddich these days) was oozing past the gullet and easing the pain that I recalled my lightly-spoken words to the better half the previous Friday. It seemed now an age ago that the glib phrase about bringing back the hardware had been turned into something akin to a knightly vow to seek the Holy Grail or die trying; pale and wan, Childe Poland cast about in despair for something to show and tell to the folks back home. As luck would have, and she usually does, sitting opposite me waiting for my flight was something with great teeth, huge eyes, and legs up to her armpits. She was all of eighteen and this was the first time that she had ever flown first class; for once however my baser instincts were sublimated because the vision in question was carrying the largest trophy I have ever seen, a three-tiered monstrosity that had to represent success in bowling or, even worse, racketball or is it racquetball; anyway it is of no import to us or our story. My eyes were glued to this thing, the trophy that is, as my evil and twisted mind schemed how to wrest it away without causing actual bodily harm; “Alea jacta est”, I muttered to myself for courage, (“The die is cast” for those who have forgotten their Suetonius), and I sidled on over to herself. Once we had established that I was old enough to be her father, that I was happily married with kids almost her age, and that this was not a cheap attempt to pick her up (two out of three isn’t bad) I bought Mavis, for such sadly, was her name, a drink and enquired after the trophy. Two more drinks and a promise later I had acquisitioned the prize for third place in the National Secretaries Speed-Typing Finals (183 w.p.m., I would like to see #1 and #2) and a head’s start on a blinding hangover as we touched down. The car was waiting with the ever efficient Ms. W. behind the wheel and even with her training and years of experience, the grail substitute made both of her eyebrows flicker momentarily, but I ignored it and moments later was bounding into the happy homestead gleefully crying some gibberish about home is the hunter home from the hills. Before the echo had died down, we do have rather a large house and the staff was all out on some curious state holiday, a note on the mantel caught my eagle eye. “Your dinner is in the dog, the dog is in the Jag, and the Jag is outside the WSBG; if you are hungry, join me there. Kiss kiss Darling, Pookie. P.S. Hope you did well.” How my wife, a woman of some class and distinction though I say it myself, came by such an awful nickname, I shall never know, but I have often remarked that people of our sort frequently grow up under the hardship of a silly and sometimes obscene sobriquet, I deposited my hard-won trophy on the hall table next to the silver tray which I knew would irritate Perkins who buttles when he isn’t drunk and left post haste for the tying on of nosebags. I was soon forgiven my tardiness as winners; so often are and the evening was spent toasting what clearly would be recorded in the family annals as a victory, Pyrrhic perhaps and certainly no Waterloo, but a victory none the less. Curiously though, she ignored the trophy.

Since time immemorial, my wife, see above, has commemorated my birthday with a plethora of gifts acknowledging my sports mania(grips, bands, supports, bags, even a book called How To Win At Everything by Dwayne Wight or was it Wayne Dwight, MD, even The Khan Game by you know who – the best advice in the worst English I have ever read, I still find myself in tense moments muttering ‘eye on ball. take big step’ as I switched part of my portfolio from PFEL to Itel for example (talk about pans and fires) – anyway this year on my birthday there in the middle of the library floor in front of the blazing fire (Scorpio, if you must know and it was darned cold last November was a huge box and Pookie was giggling like a dervish. “Open it, Open it” she cried almost in hysterics, “It’s what you’ve always wanted.” As is my want, I tore the package apart with help from the dog as my mind raced over possibilities. The old cells were really cooking but when I got to the styrofoam, I have to confess that I was stumped. By now Pookie had collapsed and the dog was rolling around on the floor trying to get a piece of string from between his considerable fangs and I did not feel much like helping him so with a deep breath I tore away the final shroud. Nestling in the detritus was an IBM Correcting Selectric II.

MORAL (for what it is worth)

NEVER CLAIM A TROPHY THAT IS ALREADY ENGRAVED

UNLESS YOU KNOW HOW TO TYPE

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FRESNO’S JOE GINET INVITATIONAL SQUASH TOURNAMENT

by Jack Sarafian

The Joe Ginet Invitational was the first tournament of the season for NorCal that turned out to be a successful and a fun tournament, Winners and runner-ups were given plaques as well as Bancroft racquets and everyone was given a tee shirt. The Saturday night party which is held annually at Leonard DeFendis‘ D & D Ranch was a festive and tremendous success on a beautiful night with flowing wine, beer, soft drinks, music with a little food.

This year at Sunday noon between the finals, Alex Eichmann put on an exhibition still showing that he is still in good shape by playing a couple of the younger A’s and showing that it is a game of control, placement, and anticipation. I would like to thank Alex at this time, not only for coming and putting on the exhibition but for encouraging a tremendous amount of his club members to come to Fresno. Thank you!

In Class A it was Karna Ghorpade beating Mike Roizen 3-1 (15-12, (12-15),17-14,15-9). To get to the finals, Ghorpade had wins over Kris Surano, Paul Gessling, and Andre Naniche – all by the score of 3-1 and former Cal students! Roizen won over Bob McMillian (5-1), Bert Kornyei (3-2) and John Lau (3-0).

It was Larry Chargin over Mike McNally 3-1 in A-35’s. (18-17, (6-15),15-10,15-7). Greg Stiles went all the way, beating John Sines 3-0, Adrian Begg 3-2 and in the finals over John Windle 3-1 (15-16),15-12,15-13,15-6), in class “B”.

Windle had wins over John Moore (3-1) and Bob Howell (3-2). In B-35’s, Steve Marks was the winner over David Cronshaw. Down 2 zip, Marks came back to win 3-2 (15-16),(13-15), 15-9,15-12,15-8). He also had wins over Harold Bell (3-0) and Leonard DeFendis (3-1). Cronshaw defeated Dave Walish (3-1) and Tom Evan (3-1). B-45 was won by Vince Palmo over Jack Sarafian 3-1 (16-14,15-13, (6-15),16-14). Gordon Clark defeated Joe Ginet 3-0, Jack Hardebeck 3-0 and, in the finals, Herb Fischbach 3-0 (15-5,18-14,15-8) to win the B-55 Class. Fischbach had wins over Jae Peterson 3-0 and Chapin Coit 3-0. Class C winner was Marc Bidart over L. Ramnarayan 3-2 after defeating James Ross 3-0, Lawrence Marum 3-1, and David Brown 3-0. Ramnarayan won over Chuck Pengilly 3-0, Anthony Bell 3-2, and Ross Williams 3-0. Class D winner Terry Wapner beat Elliot Hayne 3-2 after defeating John Foran, William Phillimore, and Ron Birdsell all 3-0. Hayne had wins over Gordon Turl 3-2, Jack Hamilton 3-0, and Bruce Gaynor 3-2 with the 5th game going 17-16. In Women’s A Double Elimination, Stacy Park came back from the loser bracket to beat Brett Gibbons 3-2 for Brett‘s first loss; then after a brief rest, they came back to play a single game for first place. Stacy won 15-9. Brett had won the first encounter with Stacy 3-2. Women’s B saw Lorrie Croze won over Catherine Gladstone 3-0. Croce beat Corkey Williams 3-1 and Jackie Eichmann 3-0. Gladstone defeated Ruth Letts and Carol Foran, both 3-0. In the Novice Class, it was Manuel Silva of Fresno over Joseph Boone of PSC 3-1 (16-17),15-5,15-4,15-6). Silva had wins over Mike Bauernfeind 3-0, Mike Coit 3-0, and John Moran. Boone had defeated Bob Vitucci 3-0 and Tom Stoepler 3-0.

I would like to thank everyone who helped make this tournament a success. Thank you.

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BOODLES BRITISH GIN DOUBL.IS

by Peter Gaynor

The 1978 Boodles British Gin Doubles was divided into three 8-team nights – Championship, Oxford and Cambridge – with the result that the teams were evenly matched.

The Championship Flight evidenced many partnership changes since the close of the 1977/78 season. True, the Pacific Coast runners up. Paul Gessling and Kris Surano were together and the favorites, but this was not to be the year of the top-seeded team. In the Semi-Finals, the team of Mike Roizen of the Olympic Club and Sunil Mehta from the Peninsula Squash Club surprised Kris and Paul by placing constant pressure on Kris, especially with high cross courts and won 3-1. Meanwhile, the Olympic Club’s power team of David Tepper and Tom Dashiell breezed to the Final without losing a game. The Final was not to be as Tom had to default and Mike and Sunil became proud owners of the Boodles British Gin Perpetual Trophy.

The Oxford Flight featured the closest matches of the tourney with Jack Bickel and John Callander playing brilliantly to upset the favorites and previous champions Alan Skelton and Paul Pringle to face John Windle and Guy Lampard who had snatched victory from the jaws of defeat in their early round matches; 3-2 over Philip Smith and Randy Adam in one, and 3-1 over Dan Heffernan and Victor Rauch in the other. The final pitted experience against young power and with Windle ripping hard racquet shots all over the court.  He and Guy won 3-0.

The Cambridge Flight was highlighted by the delicate roll-corner winners of Herb Fischbach, the oldest tournament entrant, who led his teammate Peter Gaynor to victory without the loss of a game. In the Finals against Paul Pelosi and Fred Carroll, he beat Paul continuously in the left-front corner while partner Peter cheered him on.

Once again the “Boodles” was a pleasant tournament for which the Northern California Squash Racquets Association thanks General Wine and Spirits for their sponsorship on behalf of Boodles British Gin.

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INTERCOLLEGIATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

by Paul Gessling

For the fourth year in a row, a team from the University of California Squash Racquets Club participated in the Intercollegiate Championships. This year’s team, coached by Dick Crawford, consisted of Jim Huebner, Paul Gessling, Dave Rosenberg, Rob Enea, Steve Morton, and Mark Jones. The first stop on our week-long trip was Cambridge. After our arrival Monday morning via DC-10, we stretched our legs in a team match with Tufts that afternoon. That night, with the subway broken down, the team went pub crawling in Cambridge The next day the team dragged itself to Harvard for a morning work out and then a shellacking in the afternoon by the Harvard team. That night was a replay of the previous one. Wednesday we hopped in our car and headed for Amherst. The high point of the day was visiting the Spaulding factory. The low point was losing a close match that evening. That night also gave us our first look at the coach “in action”. Thursday we drove down to West Point, site of the Tournament. We looked over the courts, renewed acquaintances from last year and went to bed early. By Friday night, we were all out of it.

In the A draw, Huebner had two good wins and then lost to Jon Foster of Penn, the eventual finalist. Gessling had an easy two rounds before getting beaten by Phil Mohtadi, the #1 seed. In the B’s, Mark Jones won his first round match but then lost the next. Morton was beaten in the first round. Both of the C players, Enea and Rosenberg lost their first-round matches.

As a team, we ended up right in the middle, #15 out of 30 teams. The best individual performance was by Jim Huebner and he was ranked *9 on the all-Tournament team.

Even after 3 matches in one day, we had somehow regained enough strength to find the local hotspots that night. Saturday though we had had enough, drove to New York and flew home a day early.

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SQUASH BLOSSOMS

by Brett Elebash

The Howe Cup intercity matches were originated to honor three national champions from the Howe family – Mrs. William Howe and her twins, Peggy and Betty. Held February 2-4 at the New Haven Lawn Club, the Cup drew 15 teams mainly from the Northeast, although for the first time since 1955. the West Coast entered a team comprised of Sue Rose and Leslie Crow from Seattle, Susie Kimberley and Ann Witsil from Portland and me, Brett Elebash.

Near the end of the round-robin in the A’s, New York and Boston were tied for first place with Boston yet to play their last match against the Pacific Coast team. Due for a win, the Coast rose to the occasion and beat the Bostonians 4-1, thereby permitting New York to grasp not just the A’s but all three flights. Also participating were teams from Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Western, a catch-all group out of Rochester. The last annual USHSRA meeting was held the same weekend.

We were welcomed by Marge Riehl, President and the rest of the organization (which merged with the USSRA in February). We gave updates of our west coast associations, clubs, tournaments, and weather as they were very eager to hear what was transpiring on the West Coast.

Amidst a snowfall, the Nationals were held the following weekend in New York City. Unfortunately, we were not really able to show the other teams our stuff; with Heather Mackay seizing the title rather handily.  Also hosted was the Mexican National team along with their coach from Mexico City and Adrienne Brandriss from L.” A. who advanced to the semis of the feed-in Consolation.

In the 51 years the Women’s U.S. National Singles Championships have been held, 1979 was the first year prize money was awarded. The women also showed their strength in the Seniors which necessarily was divided into 2 classes, the 35’s and 45’s.

And in Indianapolis, the first annual National B Championships were held with a Texan capturing the honors.

It is encouraging to see women’s squash grow, and especially nice that the West Coast has collectively decided to cultivate the game. Since heading East, I have rekindled my fire for the game and I know the girls up North are as excited as I am.

The Pacific Coast tourney drew a large and diverse number of women: the Yale varsity team, Judy Michel from Pennsylvania, the Rules and Referee Chairperson, and Pam Behrens, National B winner from Texas as well as 50 others.

Let’s continue to nourish squash on the west coast, giving all the nutrients and care it needs to produce the sweetest blossom.

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THE CONTRIBUTION THAT WAS MADE ANONYMOUSLY

IS GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGED AND ACCEPTED

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PACIFIC COAST SQUASH RACQUETS ASSOCIATION DOUBLES CHAMPIONSHIPS

by Peter Gaynor

Two NorCal teams traveled to Vancouver to compete in the Pacific Coast Doubles Championships with the Callander Cup in tow for presentation to the winners.

The Olympic Club put together a strong entry blending the experience and panache of Mike Roizen with the speed and power of Paul Gessling.

In the Semifinals, they defeated the very strong team of Brian Covernton and Larry Armstrong, both former P.C.S.R.A. Junior Champions, in the most exciting match of the tournament. As a packed gallery roared with their approval, Armstrong made diving gets time and time again to keep the play alive. However, Mike kept the pressure on Larry until victory was theirs,

In the Finals, they faced the formidable Vic Harding, former Canadian National, and USA National Singles Runner-up and his partner John Hungerford. Vic sets up and hits the ball as hard as anyone in a doubles court, and in the final analysis, it was his left wall play that made the difference.  Considering that Roizen had fractured a bone in his foot in the Semis and was heavily taped, it was a pleasant surprise that the “O.C.” team did as well as they did, losing 3-1.

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“A”LEAGUE PLAY

by John Lau

In anticipation of the new season, the team members of the Olympic Club, the Peninsula Club, and the UCSRC prepared to become much stronger to meet the new challenges of league play.

There are cries of “This will be our year!” The goal of a winning season for the ’78/79 year was realized by the Peninsula Club after winning quite handily both the first and the second round of league play.

What is intriguing about each week’s matches is the pairing of opponents which is done by the team’s captains – usually penciled in at the very last moment, a procedure which is done sometimes with and sometimes without great tact. With the exception of NorCal’s very top players, Tom Dashiell, Paul Gessling and Alex Eichmann, it is usually a toss-up to see who plays each other week in and week out. Very heated competition is the result regardless of the matchups.

Even though the Peninsula Club won both halves of the season, the level of squash among the three teams was high and balanced. Congratulations to the victorious Peninsula Club team of Alex Eichmann, Sunil Mehta, David Tepper, Jim Marver, Andre Naniche, Randy Loftin, and Marc Bidart.

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B LEAGUE PURPLE PROSE

by John Sines

A mixture of new and old resulted in a successful 1978/79 season for the B League. New teams from the Presidio and the Farm (Leland Stanford Junior University) and new players, some of the best being Don Kerr and Bob Horn, confused the issue for a time, but the Peninsula Club Five finally prevailed.

Stanford Squashers, most notably John Beaty and Randy Adam, who is no Farmer but claims to be married to one, won no team matches but gave arch-rival U. C. Beserkeley a scare before falling by 3-2.

The Presidio offered competition and remarkable architecture to its opponents. Horn and his motley crew of warriors, healers, Marin socialites (Hank Bruce) and racquetballers (Bill James) played the role of the spoiler throughout the season.  They knocked the Olympic Club out of the race with a 2-2 split on February 6.

The Berkeley Staff had a disappointing year, but Vic Rauch, Rob Kritzer, Prof. Bill Anderson (ad astra and nauseum), and associates put the Stanford and Berkeley Undergrads in their place with lopsided victories.

For once, the undergrads from U. C. had no phenoms passing through the B’s. Their lack of depth could not make up for the losses at the top and as a result, Steve Morton and Co. finished fifth in the seven-team league.

The Olympic Club’s 5-0 loss to Peninsula killed its chances for the first half title, but its 3-2 revenge in January made it the early favorite for the second half. “Unexpected” ties with the U. C. Staff and with Stanford left the Olympic Club in third place for each half of the season. But for a nick here and there, John Windle, Jim Feutz, Ross Ziegler, and Co. would have won the title,

The United Nations entry, aka U.C. Med-J.C.C. composed of a Kiwi (Don Kerr), a Limey (Adrian Begg), an Indian from India (Ravi Ramnarayan) and assorted locals (Tom Huster, Jon Hunt, and Mike Bishop) finished second both halves of the season. But for the loss of Begg, they might have won it all.

The Peninsula won the first half going away, but the loss of their number one Greg Stiles turned the second half into a scramble. Only the emergence of Marc Bidart, the Basque escapee from the frontons of Paris, and his defeat of J.C.C.’s Don Kerr in the deciding match of the season, enabled the aging but game Peninsuleers (Tony Bell, Bob Howell, John Leyerzaph, Steve Marks, John Sines, Jim Urbanski, Emmanuel Uren, and Jim Gibbons) to sweep another season.

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C LEAGUE

by Victor Rauch

After dealing with concerns about which teams actually intending to play, the 1978/79 C League finally got down to a total of seven teams competing.

The Fall League was won by the U. C. Grads by a narrow margin among the next three teams: Bay Club, U. C. Staff, and the Peninsula Club.

With the Fall’s quarreling settled, the Spring part of the league went much smoother (we selected English ball first game, white dot second game, hardball third game, and the blue dot at servers option, from 13 on). The Olympic Club and Stanford were new welcome entries with Stanford playing quite credibly despite enduring the long and frequent commute. The Peninsula Club edged a one-point victory over the Bay Club which forced a playoff with the U. C. Staff.

Under the fiery leadership of Mike Strong, along with the team of Ian Brown, Mike Button, Bill Aalbersberg, and Larry Marum, the Bears took the season’s crown.

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D LEAGUE – EAST BAY

by Roger Willis

The U. C. Berkeley D League had the same six-team composition as it had last year (3 undergraduates, 2 graduates and 1 staff). All but the staff team started the year with many new players.

In the Fall quarter, the staff team, relying heavily on experience, finesse, and a large roster came out ahead with a total of 62 points while the undergraduate #1 team took second place with 56 points. The point system – 3 for a win, 1 for a loss on court, and 0 for a loss by default – was introduced in an attempt to discourage defaults, and have as many people as possible participate. It seemed to work reasonably well.

After the quarter break, the teams were reorganized as some players had to move on to play C as a reward for tournament successes in the Fall.

In the Winter quarter, Undergraduate #1 team and Graduate #1 team both scored 62 points. With two second-half winners and one first-half winner, it scarcely helped the choice of our playoff teams that in League Play the staff had beaten Undergraduate #1 who had beaten Graduate #1 who had beaten Staff!

Given the short time remaining until the playoff, Undergraduate #1 was declared the season winner and Staff became Runner-up after a narrow playoff victory (3-2) over Graduate #1.

The playoff with the West League went smoothly thanks to the University Club and the Olympic Club providing court space.

In the semi-finals, Undergraduate #1 beat Peninsula Club 3-2 while the Staff lost to the Bay Club 4-1. Playoff participants were, for the Undergraduate #1 team: Mark Walsh, Randy Camp bell, Jeff Porter, Peter Hornick, and Joe Leitmann; and for the Staff team: Bernard Taper, Charles Fisher, Evelyn Kavaler, Lindsey Walker, and Nick Burgoyne. Evelyn and Lindsey were the sole active women players in this league and contributed much to the success and esprit de corps of the Staff team.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EXERCISE AND FITNESS

…….. squash players drink and eat rather well and the undermentioned extracts from an article by Dr. Craig Sharp, Physiological Consultant and Adviser to the Squash Player International magazine, might be of interest: 

Hangovers

It is common for men or women who have drunk too much to try and “sweat it out” of their system by exercise. However, alcohol is metabolized only by the liver, it is not a muscle fuel; and exercise, by so diminishing the flow of alcohol-laden blood through the liver, actually slows up the rate of removal of the alcohol by the liver. (Fructose, or fruit sugar, is the only substance which actually speeds up the rate of “metabolism of alcohol by the liver.) So a “loaf” and honey is better than a sauna or a game of squash after a heavy night out!

Playing Squash After Eating

If too much food is actually still in the stomach when exercise begins, then the player may feel, or be, sick; if most of the food has just managed to get into the first part of the small intestine, then its weight may drag on the fine membrane which holds the intestine in place and this may cause pain which is felt as a “stitch”.

Very fatty meals may take almost twice as long to move through the stomach and small intestine as protein or carbohydrate meals.

The whole of the digestive process is very much slowed up and it is for this reason that Dr. Craig Sharp advises us not to eat very much within two or three hours of heavy exercise. Sounds like a good idea to cut out those heavy lunches on league days.

(Courtesy of the Mashonaland Squash Racquets Association)

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RULES FOR LEAGUE PLAY

(*) denotes 78/79 changes)

A.
1. Team rosters must be presented to league chairman at the beginning of each round, but need not be ranked until the beginning of each team match.
2. NCSRA tournament classification rules shall apply for league classification (i.e. players are automatically reclassified for league play based on tournament performance during the season.)
3. Each team must play at least 3 players regularly who are classified at the team’s class.

B.
1. The fall session will begin in October.
a. No matches will be scheduled for the last three weeks in December.
b. No matches will be scheduled for Thanksgiving week.

2. Winter session will begin the first full week in January.
a. No matches will be scheduled later than NorCal Tournament.
b. No matches will be scheduled for Washington’s and Lincoln’s birthday holidays

No matches will be scheduled in Class A during the week of National Championships. 

3. No matches will be scheduled for Thursday-Sunday of NorCal Tournament weekends.
4. No team will be scheduled to play more often than once a week.
5. Postponements
a. No team match may be postponed, but a team match may be partially or completely rescheduled for an earlier date, but only upon mutual consent of individual players.
b. Individual matches may not be postponed unless:
(1) last-minute illness or injury occurs
(2) unusual, unforeseen, unavoidable (death), and last-minute circumstances occur
(3) notification and an explanation is received by the opponents prior to scheduled match time
(4) makeup match is played prior to the next scheduled team match. Failure to play makeup may result in neither player being awarded either a victory or victory points
(5) makeup matched is played prior to NorCal Tournament
(6) the final judgment will be made by League Commissioner. Postponed matches must be played within 48 hours of the scheduled date.

6. a. Weekday Schedule:               a. Justifications:

Class A- Wed            
B- Tues                                       (1) some vets may want to play B

                                                    (2) no Cs are likely to play A

C- Wed                                       (3) most Vets don’t want to play consecutive nights

D- Mon                                      (4) some Bs may play A

Vets – Thurs

7. Playoffs
a. All playoffs must be completed by NorCal Tournament
b. All playoffs must be played on neutral site
c. There will be playoffs between the winners of each half-seasons play, if different, in each league, except the D league. In the D league, the top two teams of the East and West will playoff.
d. Playoffs may be scheduled otherwise if:

(1) a schedule is published at the beginning of the season
(2) all captains agree to playoff format for selecting league winner,

C. League Administration
League Committee 7 persons not including League Commissioner
Vice President League Commissioner
Class A league chairman
Class B league chairman
Class C league chairman
Class D league chairman East
Class D league chairman West
Vets league chairman
Women’s league chairman

2. Duties

A. League Chairman of Classes
(1) publish and distribute to class captains: rosters, schedule, results, standings
(2) rule on disputes
(3) notify captains of reclassifications

B League Commissioner
(1) chooses class chairmen
(2) schedules committee meetings

C. League Committee
(1) rules on appeals to class chairmans decisions by players or captains (majority vote by full committee required)
(2) resolve schedule conflicts
(3) publish and distribute minutes of each meeting
(4) appeals must be made in writing to league committee within one week of grievance. All appeals must be resolved by NorCal Tournament.

D. League scoring IMS Individual Mach Scoring
1. Each match victory by an individual will score one point for his team.
2. Team scoring most points over the league season will be declared the league winner.

E. Rosters:
a. Must be submitted to league chairman by the first match. A player may be added to the team before each match if the new player is a NorCal member,
b. Team members may play in any order. Captains shall simultaneously exchange lineups or designate match participants.

F. Dues:
Must be received by Treasurer by the  Ralfe Miller Tournament, after which matches will be forfeited until dues paid. Club team dues$15. Berkeley undergrad and grad teams $10. Individuals must be members of NorCal (N.C.S.R.A.).

G. Attire:
Pastels are acceptable.

H. General:
Matches shall begin at 6 p.m. unless noted otherwise on schedule
The Blue Dot 70+ ball will be furnished by the home team.

*J. Eligibility:
A player may compete in League play at the level of his/her ranking for tournament play at the beginning of the First and Second Halves of the League Schedule. At the beginning of each Half of League play, those players whose rankings have changed must compete at the level of their current ranking.

The Ranking Vice President may rank a player at a higher level for reasons other than tournament play. Appeals or recommendations on ranking should be made in writing to the Vice President in charge of Ranking

K. Match Results:
It is the responsibility of the HOME captain to report match results to the League Chairman by phone or mail BEFORE the following Week’s match, or else a forfeit of the unreported match will occur.

*L. Match Arrangements:
Home team captains should contact visiting team captains to work out match arrangements.

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LEAGUE DIRECTORY

NCSRA Officers:
President, Tom Dashiell
Vice President Rankings, Guy Lampard
Vice President Leagues, Bob Howell
Secretary, Brett Elebash
Treasurer, David Brown

League Chairmen:
Class A – John Lau
Class B – John Sines
Class C – Rich Fong
Class D – John C. Moran
Women – Joan Barkan

Club Representatives and Team Captains
Bay Club, Jim Tomkins, Miles Berger
Jewish Comm. Center, C & D, Dan Forer
Olympic Club, Club Rep. Reed Foster
Peninsula Squash Club, Club Rep. Alex Eichmann
SF Tennis Club, Steve Berman
Stanford Club Rep, C & D Rob Kritzer
Univ. of Calif. Berkeley, President, Dave Jones
John Lau
B Grads, Steve Morton
B Varsity, Kevin O’Neill
C Grads, Mike Strong
C Varsity, David Quinn
C Staff, Rich Fong
D Coordinator, Mike Desmond
Women’s coordinator, Claire Nicholson

Univ. Calif. Med. Center
C, Bob Miller
D, Tom Bradley

University Club of SF
Club Rep. Tad Moore, Murray Smith, D Hillard Kahan

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INSILCO

by Guy Lampard

One of the highlights in squash for me was the opportunity to play in the recent Insilco National B/C Tournament. The tournament brought home to me that while we have the enviable distinction of playing in the NorCal Squash Association, there are as avid players in Denver, Pittsburg, Boston, and New York. It made me realize that while we may consider ourselves not quite in the league of eastern players, we are in fact of the same caliber. Consider that in the two Insilco tournaments so far held, Northern California as one of the sixteen regions, is behind only New York in the number of Insilco matches won. Of our four representatives over the past two years, two have come in second and another came in fifth (the consolation winner).

They were Dave Jones, Marc Bidart, and Jim Heubner respectively.

The 1978-79 Insilco tournament began with regional qualifications at the club level last November. Three NorCal clubs participated – the Peninsula, Olympic and University Club. The University Club strongly turned out a surprising fifty-four entrants.

The local club winners in B were Jim Feutz, Steve Marks, and Guy Lampard. In the C’s it was Jim Urbanski, Bob MacDonnell, Bill Phipps, and Marc Bidart.

The regional finals were held at the Peninsula Club the weekend of January 26-28.

Marc Bidart handily won the C Division. Guy Lampard had a tougher time, but in the end, defeated Jim Feutz in five games for the win. As an important side note, in the third game of that match at game point, Feutz called a carry – an example of what a sportsman he is.

As a result of their regional wins, Bidart and Lampard qualified for the Insilco Nationals in New York on March 10th and l1yh, courtesy of the Insilco Corporation.

Not enough can be said for the tremendous treatment awarded the thirty-two players assembled by Insilco for the tournament. Each qualifying player had won their respective local regionals; sixteen of whom were B’s and the same number in C’s. All the players were housed by Insilco at the Waldorf Astoria and the club that was used for play was the Broad Street Squash Club.

On Friday afternoon, a buffet was held at the Broad Street Club. The buffet afforded all the players an opportunity to meet their potential opponents and also to meet those responsible for the tournament. From the North America Squash Association, Darwin Kingsley, Herb Gross, and Warren Harding were in attendance. Mr. Craig Bossi, Director of Corporate Communications for Insilco was the host.

A blind drawing was held to pick the first round matches which were to begin the following day.

Bidart‘s first-round opponent was a fifteen-year-old player who quickly was up two games to none before Marc recovered and went on to win. Lampard wasn’t so fortunate as he lost to L.A.’s Rick Drooyan in a hard-fought five games. In the afternoon, Marc won with a little more ease and Guy won as well in his first round of consolation. However, the following morning, Guy was eliminated by losing to the Michigan representative.

Bidart, however, remained strong and effective in his semi-final match, winning 3-0.

Probably the most enjoyable match of the tournament to watch was the C finals between Bidart and the New York representative Fred Bass. Marc played tremendously well in a losing effort by the score of 3-1. The level of play was probably mid-A with many 20+ shot rallies. Even though Bass was a local player, the majority of spectators were rooting for Marc because of his gutsy play and good nature. He was an excellent squash diplomat for our Northern California Association.

I would like to urge everyone to participate in this year’s upcoming Insilco Tournament. Insilco has been a good friend of squash now for two years and vows to remain so if we as squash players continue to participate in the tournament they sponsor so well. Hopefully next year we can bring the Insilco perpetual trophy to Northern California.

i******

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER WOMEN’S PLAY

by Chapin Coit

The Jewish Community Center Women’s Team did very well in their second season of play in the NorCal Squash Racquets Association.

League Players were Andrea Katz, Bonnie Lord, Bonnie Luneburg, Coleen Grange, Nancy Sayles, Carol Grosz, and Joan Barkan.

The team was in first place at end of first half of season but lost to Berkeley in the second half due to University of California #1 team picking up some excellent British players.

J.C.C. lost in the playoffs to Univ. Calif. #1 team at season’s end.

Individual honors: Joan Barkan was Finalist/Runner-Up in two tournaments – University Club Invitational; Class B; Olympic Club Invitational, Class A.

We look forward to even better results in the 1979/80 Season!

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JUNIOR/NOVICE CLASSES

by Chapin Coit

The writer takes great pleasure in reporting the “Junior/Novice Classes” for the first time in our yearbook. This is a “must for future seasons as our younger players are the coming class champions/league players and hopefully Association Committee members and officers. Encouragement and development of younger players is a necessity and your venerable writer has definite opinions after forty years of active play (It’s all downhill now but it’s been great!), to improve our younger classes.

The present “Junior Class’ eligibility requirement of “Age 19 or under” must be changed to equalize mental maturity and physical ability. I suggest that “Junior Class’ age requirement be changed to “Junior Player”. The 17th birthday must be later than October 1 of the current season – players who are age 17 prior to October 1, of the current season, must play “D Class” or higher according to ability.

Next, the “Novice Class’ requirement must be flexible as “Beginners/Novices” can be any age. An example would be an adult tennis player starting squash play, technically a “Novice” at the start – BUT “Novices” should be promptly advanced into “Junior Class’ (age permitting) or “D Class’, according to ability and tournament results. Tournament Chairmen/ Ranking Committees must have authority to determine entrants classification. All this should encourage younger/beginner players to enter more Tournaments/League play by knowing they will be the assurance of competing against equally ranked players with all having a chance to win.

Your reporter feels the 1978/79 Season did not have enough “Junior/ Novice” activity and hopefully, the above-suggested classification changes plus increased promotional activity by the “Association” will produce an increase of younger players.

My following “Junior Class rankings are based on Tournament and League Play and I feel the latter competition should have some weight in making rankings. The “Novice Rankings” follow and I feel this proves my point regarding advancing “Novice Players” rapidly when you realize the age and shill of “Novices”.

“JUNIOR CLASS”.

#1 Bruce Gaynor– Olympic Club-played on Olympic Club “D “league team; Fresno/Ginct Tourna, D Class- lost semis. to “Old Pro” Elliot Hayne (3 deuce games!); PCSRA Tourna- Junior Class-won 5 player competition; NorCal Champs- won Junior Robin 4 player class.

#2 Michael Coit-Olympic Club/JCC-player JCC D League” team; Fresno/Ginet- lost “quarters” Novice to Manny Silva-class winner; Cate- lost “Junior Semis”: PCSRA- won Junior Consolation”; Nor Cal-”Novice Class”- lost 3-2 to Tom Otter (quarters)

#3 William Carlson -Berkeley-PCSRA lost finals to Bruce Gaynor, Cal. lost finals to Bruce Gaynor.  No other reported play.

“NOVICE CLASS”

Rankings from tournament play

#1– tie-Manuel Silva (Fresno) with Randy Campbell (Berkeley)

#2 -tie-Joe Boone (PSC) with Mack Walsh (Berkeley),

#3– tie-Thomas Otter (PSC) Thomas Stoepler (PSC), John Moran (PSC), with Nardin Shariff.

We must try to have larger “Junior/Novice Classes” in N.C.S.R.A. events. All adult players are urged to introduce and explain the game to potential players and the many good tennis players should provide a  fertile field. “Olympic Club” members should be able to recruit younger players from their very active/strong tennis program some “O Club” squash players must be tennis players as well.

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SAN FRANCISCO JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER

by Chapin Coit – Squash Racquets Commissioner

The 1978/79 season was once again both productive and frustrating while also another spirited year with dedicated effort and support from all players, both men, and women.

This annual enthusiasm is remarkable considering we have only one really “over-worked” court to handle individual, team practice and League play. All “Center players sincerely appreciate and thank the J.C.C. Staff for their 100% cooperation and especially for the new court scheduling program. We also have been promised a new front wall together with general court rehabilitation, before the start of the 1979/80 season.

Every squash season, our “D League” team traditionally has been the “Center”‘s center of activity with “C League” and “A-B League” or “B League” teams whenever talent is available.

This year, our “Women’s Team” came of age in its second season, established itself as a definite factor in their League. We welcome and encourage these talented and very competitive players and your writer/Commissioner has very warm feelings for helping build “Women’s Squash” at the  “Center” to their present high standing. 

Getting back to the past season – the “Center” D Team/League Play never quit trying in spite of frustrating League losses; we lost 5 of first 7 matches by (2-3) scores! S.F. Giants take heart!! But after 7 losses, we came on strong, won last three (3) team matches with a total combined score in matches (won 13x games/lost 2) 

Team players were (by position) Dan Forer (latecomer-won all 3 matches); Sharaz Kaderali, Howard Goldberg, Mark McLaughlin (leg injury during Nov-Jan) and returned to win last three (3) of his matches; Tom Rauh. Fran Rowley, Murdoch Gillespie, Chapin Coit (Cap’t), and Mike Coit.

So after a slow start to the season, our “Center’s D Team” finished a strong fourth in a six-team League

THERE’S ALWAYS NEXT YEAR!!

Our only individual tournament winners were in the Pacific Coast Championships held at the University Club in March.  Our Dan Forer won “Class D”. after a severe forehead/racquet injury occurred in the third game, Mike Coit still managed to continue and proved victorious winning the “Junior Consolation” portion of the draw.

Congratulations to both “Center” players.  Forer, by virtue of his success, advances to “C Class” play.

******

THE OLYMPIC CLUB

by Alan Fox

The Olympic Club played a significant, successful, and humorous role in the NorCal Association during 1978/79, supporting more tournaments, programs, players, and competitions than any other club in the state, and at the same time achieving its highest level of individual tournament successes in the history of the Club.

Tom Dashiell singlehandedly wrote his own chapter in Olympic Club squash history, and a brief, preliminary work on Toms successes is due. Arguably inspired by a Club circular at the beginning of the season suggesting that the Olympic Club had no one to replace Ted Gross, Tom simply won every major California tournament, the Pacific Coast Championships, earning a #9 ranking nationally. It was the best national, or regional, showing ever made by an Olympic Club squash player, or a player from the West Coast for that matter.

The Club squash program kicked off in early September in typically flamboyant fashion with the Indian Summer Handicap, run by the always popular, controversial, and Olympian tournament chairmen, Bill Garrattand Ed Marr. Ed Marrs handicapping showed so much experience, psychological understanding, and plain familiarity with the players that no complaints could, or would, be heard: it was faultless handicapping, Eddie having ensured that the top players, including himself, were bounced early. The eventual, surprise(d) winner was Charlie Drocco, who beat Dan Williams in the finals, 30, after having lost a total of only two games in earlier round matches with, in order, Messrs. Pertel, Faris, Marr, Gaynor, and Henry. Charlie’s victory and exultant mood after the match reflected a resounding reassurance of the success of a handicapped tournament in which all players compete equally, as well as a moral victory for Charlie. The previous year in the tournament, he had blown a two games to zero, 140 lead to lose to a Club opponent. Charlie opened the Olympic Club squash social season immediately after his victory by treating several friends, acquaintances, and female passers-by to well over $100 in wine at a local tavern.

A month later under the chairmanship of Jack Bickel, Hal Bell, Jon Gilbert, and Jack Sweitzer. the Club hosted the everpopular, always complicated CD Extravaganza. The eventual winner from an enormous entry of 64 C and D players was Tony Bell (PSC), who defeated the Olympic Club’s Jim Urbanski in the final 1510, 159, (1417), 1715. Jim Kempenich also of the Olympic Club reached the Class D finals before bowing to Fresnos Jack Hamilton, and Ernie Mieger (OC) defeated Harry Kramp (OC) in the Novice Class final. In Class C Consolation, Tom Dickson of the S. F. Bay Club beat Lee Turner, also of the Bay Club.

October witnessed a few other notable events of the early squash reason: Paul Gessling and Tom Dashiell entered the Oregon State Championships where Paul was a surprise finalist to Chris Burrows of Seattle. Tom was a runner-up to Arif Sarfraz in the Venice Invitational in Los Angeles. His loss in the finals representing the only in-state loss Tom suffered until late March. John Windle made an impressive debut in the higher classes, reaching the Class B finals of both the Joe Ginet Invitational in Fresno and the Venice Club Invitational. In late October, a large contingent or Olympic Club squashers traveled to the Multnomah Athletic Club in Portland for a tireless weekend of marathon squash and (as it seemed) socializing. Messrs. Feutz and Marr led both marathons.

Intense ladder activity, inter-club competition, and league play dominated the attention of most Club members during the latter months of 1978, while Dashiell dominated the Class A divisions of the Ralte Miller and the University Club of San Francisco tournaments with relative ease, and Feutz and Urbanski won the Club Insilco “B” and “C” titles.

Perhaps most memorable was the Great Court whitewash, in which both Olympic Club courts were painted during the height of Insilco play just before Christmas; the club screened off both courts, selected (and used) the wrong paint, twice, explained to a cynical membership that labor costs forced the incredible mistiming, and eventually completed the job in just under three weeks. Unfortunately, the glare of the new paint prevented effective play for another couple of weeks, the commissioner disconnected his phone for a month, and a hitherto calm, nearly placid membership vented their impressive wrath and frustrations at Olympic Club management.

Ed Marr, renaissance squasher, opened the new year with his One-Day Handicap event the weekend before the Olympic Club Invitational, and perfect organization resulted in great fun, good squash, and a second straight winner’s trophy to Reed Foster, the quiet gentleman Hustler. Since Marr controlled the results, it was difficult to determine whether Foster won on points or on Marr‘s admiration for Reed‘s Bobby Riggs-type play.

The Olympic Club Invitational was typically big and brassy. Dashiell moved through the “A” Class rather easily to defeat unexpected finalist Jim Huebner, while Bob Horne of the Presidio won the first of his Class B titles, overcoming the mercurial John Windle in the finals. Other winners included Jim Gibbons over George Bates, 3-0, in Class C, Dave Rosenberg over the Olympic Club’s Jack Sweitzer, 3-1, in Class D, Brett Elebash over Joan Barkan in the Women’s Open. Bill Anderson over Floyd Svensson, 3-0, in the Senior Open, Steve Yost over Jack Sarafian, 3-1, in B 45’s, and Dick Crawford over Emmanuel Uren, 3-0, in Jr. B Vets.

February and March featured the height of an intense tournament season, in which ladder and interclub competition gave way to heavy participation in the season’s big tournaments including the Nationals, Cal State, NorCal, and Pacific Coast Championships. Tom Dashiell won the latter three tournaments with a combined total of only two games lost and was a quarter-finalist in the Nationals losing to eventual winner Mario Sanchez. Paul Gessling defeated Seattle’s Mark Alger in the Pacific Coast before bowing to Tom in the finals

Ed Marr surprised himself, and possibly others, by capturing the Pacific Coast B-Vet 45’s championship after several previous tries, and Bruce Gaynor combined power, court familiarity and nepotistic support to win the Pacific Coast Juniors. A week after the Coast, junior Rich Morrissey traveled to Los Angeles to capture the Southern California D’s in nearly his only tournament appearance of the year. Based primarily on their play in the Nationals in Portland, several Olympic Club players, including Dashiell. Paul Gessling, Steve Yost, Murray Smith, and Alan Fox, attained national rankings for the year,

The memory of the late Arthur Tudury, whose squash legacy includes, among other, more impressive contributions the quote, “If you can’t volley, wear velvet socks,” was prominent in the end-of-season Members-Only Championship. Gessling surprised Tom Dashiell in the A’s, Reed Foster won both the C’s and C-Vets, Bill Smith beat Tom Henry in the D’s, Herm Zwart won the Senior round-robin, Jack Bickel took the B-Vet title over Reed Freyermuth, Chairman Jim Feutz impressed numerous people with his late night phone calls, and, perhaps most significantly, Olympian Bill Garratt won the first annual Art Tudury Award for long term contributions to the squash program, court deportment, and general sportsmanship.

It was a great, active season, and the impressive tournament achievements of the top Club players marked the zenith of what has been a long building program toward athletic success. Dashiell dominated, a healthy string of challengers emerged, and the program remained healthier and more enthusiastic than ever.

******

PENINSULA SQUASH CLUB

by Alex Eichmann

The highlight of the squash season at the Peninsula Squash Club had to be the round-robin professional spectacle which took place in December 1978. Six of the top ten ranked pros played 15 matches over a three day period for a total purse of $5,000. To nobody’s surprise, the great Sharif Khan (ten times North American Open Champ) walked away with the top prize. However, Sharif‘s victory was not without difficulty, as he had to struggle, barely beating his younger brother, Aziz 3-2 and also Gordon Anderson 3-2. The other pros taking part in the three-day event were Clive Caldwell (2nd place), Frank Satterthwaite, and Stu Goldstein. Those in the gallery who watched the matches saw the finest squash ever played in the Bay Area. Fortunately for those squash enthusiasts who missed the round robin, the pros promised to return to the PSC during the 1979/80 season. We certainly look forward to again seeing them play here.

Many of our members distinguished themselves by winning championships over the course of the season. However, one member, in particular, stood out as having had a most successful and noteworthy season.

That member is Marc Bidart.

In October ’78 after playing for only 11 years, Marc came away with the Class C title in Fresno’s Joe Ginet Invitational. A few months later, Marc defeated the INSILCO “C” Club Champions in Northern California, all 3-0, thus winning a free trip to New York to play in the INSILCO National Finals. Only 16 players won trips to the Big Apple out of an entry of 2,500. At age 40, Marc was the oldest in the final 16 but also had the least experience (2 years). Marc‘s determination and hustle carried him through three tough matches and into the final against NY’s A player, Fred Bass. Marc made a remarkable showing but succumbed 3-1.

The PSC “C” players had an extraordinary year winning 5 out of 6 events. After Bidart’s win at Fresno, our PSC stalwarts came up empty in the following tournament at Berkeley.

But fortunes changed. 

From there on it was Tony Bell over Jim Urbanski to take The Olympic Club’s C-D; Emmanuel Uren winning the O.C. Invitational; Jim Gibbons was victorious in the University Club event, and Harry Verby beating clubmate Mike Goldfield for the NorCal win.

Noteworthy tournament wins were: Fresno- Greg Stiles “B”; Lorrie Croze Women’s B; Gordon Clark Seniors; Steve Marks Vets B. NorCal (played at PSC) Jon Hunt Vets B; Howard Maierhofer Vets C; Brett Elebash Women’s A; Carol Foran Women’s B; Herb Fischbach Seniors. University Club: Brett Elebash “D”.

In League play, PSC again was successful, winning the A title for the 4th straight year. Headed by pro-Alex Eichmann, the A team consisted of Sunil Mehta, Andre Naniche, Jim Marver, and David Tepper, with help from Greg Stiles, Marc Bidart, Dan Morgan, and Steve Marks.

The B team repeated this year, winning despite losing their number one player, Greg Stiles at mid-season. We wish Greg good luck in L. A. Members of the victorious team were John Sines, Steve Marks, Bob Howell, Tony Bell, Marc Bidart, and John Leyerzaph

In the Vets competition, the PSC players were so strong and won their matches so decisively that the league was terminated mid-season. For being so good, no awards went to “old men” Jon Hunt, John Leyerzaph, Steve Marks, Marc Bidart, Bob Howell, Tony Bell, Emmanuel Uren, and Jim Urbanski.

The PSC C and D teams both reached the playoffs but bowed to the opposition. A few players vowed to practice diligently for next year’s League play. Others said they played just for the fun of it anyway and winning wasn’t everything.  Huh?  But isn’t that what it’s all about?

******

SAN FRANCISCO BAY CLUB

by Pat Fleischauer

The squash season got off to an early start at the Bay Club this year with members battling each other for the Club’s divisional titles the weekend of August 5th. Winning such a title was a testimony to both skill and endurance as some divisions played all o! their round-robin matches in a single day

In the finals, it was Lee Turner over Lance Carnes in the Men’s Advanced Division. Mac MacCauley over Scott Sollars in the Intermediate Division, Carl Steiner over Ken Fitzsimmons in the Novice, and Mary Lowrey defeated Susan Davis in the Women’s Intermediate division.

Following the intraclub tourney, Bay Clubbers participated in all tournaments played this season in Northern California. They were particularly successful the weekend of Nov. 4th at The Olympic Club C-D where Charles Bassetti and Paul Barber were semi-finalists in the upper and lower brackets while Lee Turner and Tom Dickson were finalists in the consolations.

While the men were playing in San Francisco, the women played across the bay in Berkeley in the Ralfe Miller Invitational. In Women’s B, Marcia Greve defeated fellow Bay Clubber Margo Hand and eventually won the B division outright.

With increased interest in squash at the Bay Club this season, teams were entered in the C and D Leagues as well as the second half of the Women’s League. 

C League players were Paul Barber. Charles Basetti, Marcus Byruck, Tom Dickson, Jim Tompkins, and Lee Turner. Though the team lacked depth, they won 5 of 6 matches in the first half and were undefeated in the second half of the season! Despite this outstanding record, they finished second overall due to total game scores.

D League team members were Miles Berger, Norm Boone, Santiago Montufar. Frank Reese, Bob Umbdenstock, Chris Owens, Bruce Gilmore, Charlie Kay, and Lance Carnes. Not to be outdone by the success of the C team, the D team finished in a dead tie for first place with Peninsula Club.

In the playoffs, the Bay Club defeated both the Berkeley Faculty-Grads and the Berkeley #1 team to capture the overall D League title. The team should be commended for not forfeiting any matches throughout the entire season. By the end, they could look back and see much improvement as a team as well as individually. 

Incidentally, Montufar who had. been playing number 3 on the team, won the D title at the season-ending NorCal Championships.

The women’s team was less successful than the men’s having lost several of its regulars at the start of the season. League matches provided valuable experience for team members Jennifer Baldwin. Debbie Boeha-Ravis, Susan Doyle, Pat Fleischauer, Marcia Greve, Susie Lautze, Linda Miro, and Lathy Sollers.

And last but not least, Bay Club squashers had a chance to show their racquetball clubmates what racquet sports are really all about when they hosted the women’s division of the 5th annual Pacific Coast Squash Racquets Association Tournament. With 54 women participating in A, B, and C classes, they played all but the semi-final and final matches at the Bay Club, The day and a half of competition drew enthusiastic viewers from many of the Club’s closet squash players as well as many who never knew what really went on over on those “tiny” courts by the weight room.

******

UNIVERSITY CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO

by Tad Moore

1978-79 was another active season for University Club Squash. Our season began in September with Jake Walker running a highly successful intra-club Handicap Tournament. Ned Bulkley and Dwight Simpson ran a tremendous Invitational that will be hard to duplicate in upcoming years, Peter Gaynor, Guy Lampard and a host of other members again served as directors of the Boodles British Gin Doubles Tourney and made it one of the more enjoyable and popular tournaments of the year.

The University Club was honored to host both the Pacific Coast Doubles and Pacific Coast Singles. The finest players on the West Coast were well represented and their matches provided fantastic action for all of us experience. We ran a very successful INSILCO Tournament indicated by the fact that our club had the highest number of participants in the Country. The Club was doubly honored when Guy Lampard won the Regionals and won the right to represent us in New York City.

NorCal League Play was well supported and enjoyed by a dozen-plus Club members.

We were fortunate enough to have the great Hashim Khan give an exhibition at our Courts. Tom Dashiell and Hashim provided a tremendously entertaining evening for all. In the upcoming season, we hope to have Hashim and other professionals participate in more entertaining and enjoyable exhibitions.

Finally, Paul Pringle ran our end of the season Club Championships. It was an excellent cap to a very active and very entertaining year.

******

THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – SAN FRANCISCO

by Joe Jezukewicz

Today’s emphasis on physical fitness has had a beneficial impact on squash activity at the University of California – San Francisco.

TWO 4-week squash clinics conducted by Joe Jezukewicz and Bob La Pointe were both oversubscribed. Daily use of the two squash courts appears to be nearly 100%. Unfortunately, squash enthusiasts must compete with racquetball players who insist they can play their “game” onn the smaller squash court.

However, things are looking up. For the past year, the campus recreation department in the persons of Al Merr and Al Minville has been working on a proposal to add two racquetball courts and an additional squash court adjacent to the existing facilities, Campus support has been very strong and hope remains high that this proposal will develop into a full-fledged project in the near future. Participation in the NCSRA brought some noteworthy accomplishments to several individuals. Dr. Mike Goldfield advanced to Class B by becoming a finalist in the NorCal Championships, losing to Harry Verby. Our “Bridesmaid of the Year” Award went to Dr. John Derdivanis (who also plays at UC Berkeley). John has come so close to winning so many times that we are sure he will advance to the B’s next season.

Bonnie Lord and Andrea Katz were regular participants in N.C.S.R.A. events. Andrea also conducted a women’s squash clinic this Spring, In League play, Tom Huster led a lively A-B team through the rigors of the Association’s toughest competition.

In all, it was a good year for squash and we all look forward to continued participation.

******

NCSRA MEMBERSHIP

C. Randal Adam
William S. Anderson
Joseph F. Azrack
Joan D. Barkan
John Paul Barber
George W. Bates
Thomas Bauch
William H. C. Bassetti
Adrian C. Begg
Antony G. Bell
Harold T. Bell
Miles Berger
Stephen J. Berman
Alan L. Bernstein
John H. Bickel
Marc Bidart LIFE
Richard Bidleman LIFE
Cara Black
Lawrence D. Blair
Simon J. Blattner Jr.
Joe Boone
Norman M. Boone
Deanne Broglio
David S. Brown Jr
Ian Brown
James K. Brown
Hank C. Bruce Jr.
John Buechsenstein
Nick Burgoyne
John Burnap
Robert D. Burrows
Martin Button
Marcus L. Byruck
Charles Callander
John N. Callander LIFE
Randy Campbell
John Campodonico LIFE
Lance Carnes
Chet Ciccarelli
Gordon F. Clark
Don Clelland
C. B. (Tim) Cohler
Donald Cohon Jr.
Chapin Coit
Michael W. Coit
James A. Cowan
Dick Crawford
Richard Croll
Lorrie Croze
Thomas C. Dashiell
Richard H. Daniel
Eric T. Davis
Susan W. Davis
Stephen F. De Luchi
John P. Derdivanis LIFE
Park T. Dingwell LIFE
A. Barr Dolan
Ed Dold
Christopher S. Dove LIFE
Jerome C. Draper Jr
Alex Eichmann HONORARY LIFE
Brett Elebash
Robert Enea
Hector Fernandez-Barillas
James F. Feutz
Allen A. Fienberg
Herbert Fischbach
Charles Fisher
Patricia Fleischauer
Rich Fong
John F. Foran
Dan Forer
Denis M. Torster
Mary F. Forte
Reed Foster LIFE
Leo F. Frick
William R. Garratt LIFE
Bruce D. Gaynor
Charlotte L. Gaynor
Peter T. Gaynor
V. C. Gee
Paul Gessling
James M. Gibbons
Rod Gobel
Michael D. Goldfield
Stuart M. Gordon
Marcia Greve
David G. Gruber
Margo Hand
Raija 0. Hannam
John G. Harlow
Elliot A. Hayne
Patrick Healy
Dan Heffernan
Wellington Henderson LIFE
Dan Hershberger
Robert T. Horn
David J. Hosbein
Robert B. Howell
Jon Hunt
Thomas Huster
Rich Jacinto
William D. James
Willard S. Johnston
Joseph D. Joiner
Robert H. Jones
George A. Juarez
Hillard M. Kahan
Khan A. Kamal
Andrea Katz
Evelyn Kavaler
Ralph L. Keeney
William J. Kempenich
Mike S. Kennedy
Donald D. Kerr
James F. Kirkham
Stephen R. Koch
Harry R. Kramp
Robert Kritzer
John Kunze
Guy Lampard
B. Peck Lau LIFE 
John Lau
Joe Leitmann
John A. Letts LIFE
Ruth Letts
John W. Leyerzaph
Steve Lockard
Randy Loftin
Bonnie A. P. Lord
Bonnie Luneburg
Thomas J. Mahon
Howard Maierhofer LIFE
Ricki Mainardi
Mike Mainardi
Roger A. Mann LIFE
Steven F. Marks LIFE
Edwin G. Marr
Lawrence H. Marum
James D. Marver
Henry P. Massey
James May
Brian L. McEachron
Donald G. McEdwards
Mari J. McLoughlin
Thomas V. Metz
Maurice M, Milam
Daniel G. Miller
A. Kirk Miller
William J. Miller
Santiago L. Montufar
James. Thaddeus Moore
John C. Moran
Daniel Morgan LIFE
Howard Morrelli LIFE
Richan T. Morrissey
Richard Morton LIFE
Robert S. Mueller
David E. Mundel
Claire Nicholson
Christopher Nadai
David Noorthoek
Tom R. Norris
Kevin O’Neil
Thomas A. Otter LIFE
Charles Pengilly
Walter F. Pettit
Jeff Porter
Jennifer Preiss
Paul C. Pringle
L. Ramnarayan
Thomas R. Rauch
Victor Rauch
Barry Reder
Frank D. Reese
Tom Richardson
John C. Riley
Peter Robertson
Daniel W. Roberts
David B. Roe
Michael F. Roizen
Ronald E. Rosden
David Rosenberg
James F. Ross
Jack Sarafian LIFE
Alexander Sarris
Fred Schurkus
John Sellery
Ronald A. Seltzer
Stephen R. Sharpe
Charles Simpson
David A. Simpson
Dwight J. Simpson LIFE
John B. Sines
Alan Skelton
Murray Smith
Robert L. Smith LIFE
William J. Smith
Kathie Sollers
Steve Spaulding
Virginia Stephenson
Gregory A. Stiles
Thomas M. Stoepler
Bryan Street
Michael Strong
David Sundelson
Kris Surano
Floyd Svensson
Jack Sweitzer
Bernard Taper
David L. Tepper
Geoffrey W. Thomas
Douglas Thompkins LIFE
Robbin W. Thorp
James E. Tomkins
Roy B. Torbert
Robert R. Trout
Stephen Tucker
Lee B. Turner
Nicholas C. Unkovic
James S. Urbanski
Emmanuel Uren LIFE
Harry D. Verby
Dave R. Walish
Lindsey Walker
Mark L. Walsh
Daniel S. Weiss
Edgar M. Wells
S. Ben Werner
Grier Wiggins
Dan B. Williams
Ross P. Williams
Roger Willis
John Windle
Stephen Wolbers
Christopher J. Wright
Jill K. Yokomizo
Shannon Wong
Steve Yost
Ross Ziegler
Hern Zwart LIFE

 

******

PACIFIC COAST SQUASH ASSOCIATION RANKINGS 1979

MEN’S A
1. T. DASHIELL, CA
2. A. SARFRAZ, CA
3. C. BURROWS, WASH.
4. P. GESSLING, CA
5. T. BALE, B.C.
6. R. FLEMING, B.C.
7. M. ALGER, WASH.
8. M. GREENWOOD, B.C.
9. S. LAWTON, ALBERTA
10. J. LAU, CA
11. C. STRACHEN, ALBERTA
12. N. DEMPSEY, ALBERTA
13. D. THOMAS, ALBERTA
14. B. HARDING, WASH.
15. S. MEHTA, CA
16. I. SIGAILIS, ALBERTA
17. C. YOUNG, ALBERTA
18. P. NANAVATI, ALBERTA
19. W. BOWES, ALBERTA
20. J. HUEBNER, CA
21. V. HARDING, B.C.
22. EASTON, ALBERTA
23. K. GHORPADE, CA
24. M. ROIZEN, CA
25. R. RADLOFF, WASH.

MEN’S B
1. C. BAIN, WASH.
2. R. HORN, CA
3. R. FERGUSON, ALBERTA
4. R. KRITZER, CA
5. R. DROOYAN, CA
6. G. STILES, CA
7. R. ADAM, CA
8. R. ARMSTRONG, B.C.
9. I. GORDON, CA
10. R. LABBE, OR
11. B. LANE, WA
12. B. LENHART, WASH.
13. D. WILLARD, B.C.
14. G. WILLIAMS, B.C.
15. J. WINDLE, CA
16. N. FINN, ALBERTA
17. J. MCKENZIE, ALBERTA
18. K. RICHMOND, ALBERTA
19. A. TISCHLER, CA
20. T. MCNEIL, B.C.

(*) MOVE UP ONE CLASS

MEN’S C
1. B. JOHNSON, WASH.
2. H. LaBOSSIER, WASH.
3. M. PAGON, CA
4. A. BRANDRISS, CA
5. S. DEAN, WASH.
6. M. HEANEY, B.C.
7. R. McCRIMMON, ALBERTA
8. B. NELSON, ALBERTA
9. H. VERBY, CA
10. P. SONG, CA
11. D. WALKER, ALBERTA

MEN’S D
1. D. FORER, CA
2. S. WALL, OR
3. M. ROSENBERG, CA
4. B. BOLIN, B.C.
5. T. HEALY, WASH.
6. S. HOPP, WASH.
7. T. METZ, CA
8. S. MONTUFAR, CA
9. R. MORRISSEY, CA
10. S. SHARPE, CA
11. R. NELSON, B.C.

MEN’S A 35
1. L. HARDING, WASH.
2. R. RADLOFF, WASH.
3. G. MORFITT, B.C.
4. C. MERSOLA, CA
5. S. KOSKI, OR
6. D. DUDAS, CA
7. R. LOFTIN, CA
8. D. MORGAN, CA
9. B. SEYMOUR, CA
10. L. LaBOSSIER, WASH.

MEN’S A 45
1. L. BARCLAY, B.C.
2. D. DALY, WASH.
3. D. MORGAN, ALBERTA
4. E. HELFELD, C
5. M. SMITH, CA
6. J. SIEGENBERG, ALBERTA
7. H. GODSMAN, ALBERTA
8. H. GOLEY, ALBERTA
9. R. RAGEN, WASH.
10. T. OWENS, WASH.

MEN’S A 55
1. F. SVENSSON, CA
2. A. SANTILLI, OR
3. J. FROLIK, CA

JUNIORS
1. B. GAYNOR, CA
2. D. STYNER, ALBERTA
3. H. WOOLLEY, B.C.
4. E. BARCLAY, B.C.
5. R. CARLSON, CA
6. R. JACKSON, B.C.
7. A. LOVETT, WASH.
8. T. HOSBEIN, CA
9. D. GODSMAN, ALBERTA
10. P. GODDERIS, WASH.
11. K. RICHMOND, ALBERTA
12. G. CLARK, CA
13. H. LaBOSSIER, WASH.
14. M. PALMER, B.C.
15. A. COTE, ALBERTA

MEN’S B 35
1. M. KAFFKA, B.C.
2. J. ALDEN, OR
3. R. CRAWFORD, CA
4. G. LUDWICK, WASH.
5. D. CRONSHAW, CA
6. D. SPEIRS, CA
7. M. KURATLI, OR
8. J. HUNT, CA
9. G. SMITH, B.C.
10. J. BOERNER, CA MEN’S

B 45
1. E. WALTERS, WASH.
2. E. MARR, CA
3. S. De FORREST, WASH.
4. W. ANDERSON, CA
5. S. YOST, CA
6. J. SARAFIAN, CA
7. G. DOBBS, ALBERTA
8. B. BRUNN, CA
9. V. PALMO, CA
10. P. DAY, ALBERTA

MEN’S B 55
1. K. TOURTELLOT, WASH
2. H. FISCHBACH, CA
3. H. LA RUE, CA
4. G. CLARK, CA
5. G. LIVINGSTON, WASH.
6. W. PETTIT, CA
7. J. SWEET, WASH.
8. F. SMITH, CA
9. F. WALLACE, B.C.
10. M. MATHEWS, CA

(*) MOVE UP ONE CLASS

WOMEN’S A
1. A. BRANDRISS, CA
2. S. PARK, CA
3. B. PATON, ALBERTA
4. B. ELEBASH, CA
S. S. GRIMSDICK, B.C.
6. S. ROSE, WASH.
7. J. CARTMEL, B.C.
8. G. THOMAS, B.C.
9. C. COVERNTON, B.C.
10. R. WIDMER, ALBERTA
11. E. KAVALER, CA 
12. J. DAVIS, ALBERTA
13. J. WESCOTT, B.C.
14. C. NICHOLSON, CA
15. B. SAVAGE, ALBERTA
16. J. RYAN, ALBERTA
17. S. KIMBERLEY, OR
18. L. CROW, B.C.
19, P. CROSS, ALBERTA
20. M. LIMBERT, B.C.
21. M. MONTALBANO, CA
22. L. DIXON, ALBERTA.
23. J. BARKAN, CA
24. D. SIMONS, B.C.
25. K. TRACE, ALBERTA

WOMEN’S B
1. T. GIROLAMI, WASH
2. D. SIMMONS, B.C.
3. A. RYAN, ALBERT
4. P. ARMSTRONG, BC.
5. D. ALDRICH, ALBERTA
6. A., JOHNSON, OR
7. H. HAZEN, OR
8. E. KAVALER, CA
9. C. FORAN, CA 10.
10. J. NEVELER, WASH.

WOMEN’S C
1. T. P. WALTERS, WASH.
2. J. DOLAN, OR
3. S. HARDING, WASH.
4. M. AIKENS, B.C.
5. S. CHOER, CA
6. S. HENRY, WASH.
7. N. MORGAN, WASH.
8. J. AALAND, ALBERTA
9. P. ADAMIAK, ALBERTA
10. K. BECK, WASH.

******

NCSRA RANKINGS

CLASS A
1. TOM DASHIELL 
2. JOHN LAU
3. PAUL GESSLING
4. MIKE ROIZEN
4. JIM HUEBNER
6. SUNIL MEHTA
6. RANDY LOFTIN
8. KRIS SURANO
8. ANDRE NANICHE

SENIORS
1. FLOYD SVENSSON
2. BILL ANDERSON

A 35
1. RANDY LOFTIN
2. LARRY CHARGIN
3. ALAN FOX
3. MIKE MCNALLY
5. STEVE MARKS
5. DAN MORGAN
5. MURRAY SMITH

CLASS B
1. BOB HORN
2. ROB KRITZER
2. GREG STILES
4. JOHN WINDLE
5. GUY LAMPARD
6. BOB HOWELL
6. JOHN SINES
8. RANDY ADAM
9. ADRIAN BEGG
9. BART STUCK

C 35
1. H. MAIERHOFER
2. BOB BURROWS
3. DON HILL
3. ROGER MANN

WOMEN’S A
1. BRETT ELEBASH
2. EVELYN KAVALER
3. JOAN BARKAN
3. CLAIRE NICHOLSON
S. PAT FLEISCHAUER
5. ANDREA KATZ

B 35
1. DICK CRAWFORD
2. JON HUNT
3. STEVE MARKS
3. JACK SARAFIAN
3. EMMANUEL UREN
6. TONY BELL
6. JIM FEUTZ
8. LOREN CAMPBELL
8. LEN DE FENDIS
8. TOM HUSTER
8. JIM KEMPENICH
8. PAUL PRINGLE

B 45
1. BILL ANDERSON
2. ED MARR
2. JACK SARAFIAN
4. STEVE YOST
5. VINCE PALMO
6. DON SMITH
7. JACK BICKEL
7. REED FOSTER
7. ELLIOT HAYNE
7. DAN WILLIAMS
7. HERM ZWART

B 55
1. HERB FISCHBACH
1. HUGH LA RUE
3. GORDON CLARK
3. WALT PETTIT
5. FRANK SMITH
6. CHAPIN COIT

JUNIORS
1. BRUCE GAYNOR
2. BILL CARLSON

NOVICE
1. RANDY CAMPBELL
1. MANUEL SILVA
3. JOSEPH BOONE
3. MARK WALSH
5. JOHN MORAN
5. THOMAS OTTER
5. NARDIN SHARIFF
5. THOMAS STOEPLER

CLASS C
1. HARRY VERBY
2. MARC BIDART
3. JIM GIBBONS
3. KEVIN O’NEILL
3. EMMANUEL UREN
6. GEORGE BATES
7. TOM DICKSON
7. ED DOLD
7. MIKE GOLDFIELD
7. L. RAMNARAYAN
11. DAVID BROWN
11. JOHN DERDIVANIS
11. LARRY MARUM
11. MIKE STRONG
11. ROSS WILLIAMS

CLASS D
1. DAN FORER
2. BRETT ELEBASH
3. TOM METZ
3. S. MONTUFAR
3. TERRY WAPNER
7. JOHN BURNAP
7. CHET CICCARELLI
7. JOE FIGENBAUM
7. ELLIOT HAYNE
7. JACK SWEITZER
12. RON BIRDSELL
12. JOE BOONE
12. MARTIN BUTTON
12. RICHARD DANIEL
12. BRUCE GAYNOR
12. JOHN KUNZE
12. JOHN MORAN
12. ROGER WILLIS

WOMEN’S B
1. LORRIE CROTE
2. CAROL FORAN
3. MARSHA GREVE
3. EVELYN KAVALER
5. JOAN BARKAN
5. DEE BROGLIO
5. JACKIE EICHMANN
5. KATHY SELLERS
9. MARGO HAND

******

 

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